Previous Exhibitions

Previous Exhibitions

Alasdair Craig

Alasdair Craig

11 Tower View

Alasdair Craig started chainsaw carving in 2011. Prior to that he had trained and worked as a stone setter and gold smith completing a 5 year apprenticeship at Cellini Pearls in Cambridge. Whilst there, he was nominated and won the edge young practical learner of the year award In 2006. As a goldsmith, Alasdair developed a love of bold flowing lines and tries to incorporate them into his woodwork alongside classical and contemporary designs. Alasdair’s work has been on display in public parks in Hayward Heath and Crawley, as well as many schools around Sussex and Reading. 

www.sussexchainsaw.com

Helen Brown

Helen Brown

35 Kings Hill Ave

I am a woodcut printmaker based in Sussex. Here on my website you will find a selection of my latest works, most are from the South Downs, as this is my home and a great love, I do have pieces from further afield, and am also open to commissions.

 

I draw directly from the landscape onto wooden blocks, I then carve into the blocks and print from them. All of my work is handmade and each one of my pieces is given individual life though chine colle (paper overlay) and hand tinting, just as the mood of a scene shifts with light, time and experience.

 

I spend time in the places my work depicts, returning to them. My prints are imbued with the emotion of place. Working outdoors enables me to connect with the spirit of the place, capturing the line and fluidity of scenes and localities

www.helensprints.co.uk

Brian Bartlett

Brian Bartlett

11 Tower View & 39 Kings hill Ave

Following a B.A. in Fine Art at Portsmouth, Brian was awarded a travel scholarship to the USA, where he gained his Masters Degree at the University of Eastern Illinois.

On his return to England, he lived in London where he painted and exhibited.  He has had many exhibitions and his paintings are in collections as far afield as New Zealand and the U.S.A.  He now lives and works by the sea in Kent.

Brian has said ‘My paintings are very much influenced and affected by my love of painting, particularly Post War British Abstraction. I start a painting by applying paint at random. Initially the painting itself dictates its own direction, until form is found and a painting is ‘born’, often, but not always, of an image remembered, it might be a landscape, an interior or a still-life. As I paint, I try to reduce and simplify the image to capture and convey the mood or atmosphere it created.’

 

The vigorous compositions of colour and light that result create a very real sense of space. Brian’s paintings can be seen as celebrations of colour which are both decorative and sensual. Colours glow and sing with a vibrancy and sensuality that become expressions of the joy of life.

Doug Peters

Doug Peters

39 Kings Hill Ave

The work on show was taken from an exhibition entitled ‘I’m a Photographer get me out of here’, where Doug showed with another photographer, Richard Chambury, whose work can be seen in 6 Alexander Grove.

 

With 40 years of experience photographing the world's fame junkies, from A to Z listers, miles upon miles of red carpet, screaming fans, royal weddings, funerals and babies, “ I’m A Photographer Get Me Out Of Here" was always going to be the call from photographers Doug Peters and Richard Chambury, as they felt the need to escape the utter madness of Planet Celebrity and reconnect with what made them want to pick up a camera in the first place.

Friends and colleagues for more than 20 years, they share the same need to create images far removed from what they are required to capture on a daily basis. The images brought together in this joint exhibition show just how far they have gone to exorcise their showbiz demons.

Doug takes us as far away from the life he knows, often ending up in a much quieter landscape, spending hours waiting for the weather to work its magic with the landscape he has chosen to photograph. These are not the picture postcard places you see in a brochure, but more interesting sparse land and seascapes, where a visit to the supermarket is done monthly in a truck, because it's a 300 mile round trip.

Richard's photographs take a sideways and often amusing look at the world around us, concentrating on the people he comes across often on journeys up and down the country. With great changes to the photographic industry and the introduction of digital, he has embraced all the new technology, shooting reportage images with medium format film, plastic lomography cameras, dSLR and lately the Apple iPhone.

www.dougpetersphotography.com

Rich Chambury

Rich Chambury

6 Alexander Grove

The work on show was taken from an exhibition entitled ‘I’m a Photographer get me out of here’, where Richard showed with another photographer, Doug Peters, whose work can be seen in39 Kings Hill Ave.

 

With 40 years of experience photographing the world's fame junkies, from A to Z listers, miles upon miles of red carpet, screaming fans, royal weddings, funerals and babies, “ I’m A Photographer Get Me Out Of Here" was always going to be the call from photographers Doug Peters and Richard Chambury, as they felt the need to escape the utter madness of Planet Celebrity and reconnect with what made them want to pick up a camera in the first place.

Friends and colleagues for more than 20 years, they share the same need to create images far removed from what they are required to capture on a daily basis. The images brought together in this joint exhibition show just how far they have gone to exorcise their showbiz demons.

Richard's photographs take a sideways and often amusing look at the world around us, concentrating on the people he comes across often on journeys up and down the country. With great changes to the photographic industry and the introduction of digital, he has embraced all the new technology, shooting reportage images with medium format film, plastic lomography cameras, dSLR and lately the Apple iPhone.

Doug takes us as far away from the life he knows, often ending up in a much quieter landscape, spending hours waiting for the weather to work its magic with the landscape he has chosen to photograph. These are not the picture postcard places you see in a brochure, but more interesting sparse land and seascapes, where a visit to the supermarket is done monthly in a truck, because it's a 300 mile round trip

http://richfoto.com/

Yvonne Lyons

Yvonne Lyons

4 Abbey Wood Rd

Yvonne Lyons is a Scottish artist and illustrator based on the North Kent coast. She is self-taught and finds inspiration through nature and poetry, finding wonder in the everyday, so that each of her paintings has a unique character in its own right.

Yvonne grew up in Scotland and has gone from the rough, wild mountains of Scotland to London’s rich variations and busy streets to beautifully manicured Kent with its chocolate-box oast houses, duck ponds and candy-coloured beach huts.

This is reflected in the rich colour and quick movement in her paintings, giving a spontaneous yet slightly melancholy edge to her work.

www.yvonnelyons.co.uk

Andrew Rollo

Andrew Rollo

34 Tower View

My work focuses on the formal elements of visual language and the act of looking and responding to our world. Working in acrylics and oils I explore shape and colour juxtapositions, together with repetition, creating pieces that evoke pictorial realities of stability and instability.

 

The act of producing an art piece is wholly absorbed in the process of creating stability from an unstable situation. Only when the piece is ‘completed’ does there appear a resolution to the striving. I am endlessly searching for stability – responding to visual and personal experiences – the tenuous nature of reality as seen through psychology, geology etc and hopefully fixing something, that in life would only be appreciable for a moment.

 

The placement of shape and colour and the decision making involved is basically a demonstration of an understanding of magnetic forces – the push and pull of juxtapositions of hue – the opticality of colour and how colour behaves – their shifting relative weights and tensions. The range of hues, tones and shapes have a magnetic relationship of attraction or repulsion, which creates movement in one direction or another. I, as the painter, is acting like a composer of a symphony or a pop song. This means that sometimes, in order to understand the character of one hue and the next, one might have to transfer meaning from one to another. This is a difficult and organic process because to really discover what the colour and shapes want to do, one might have to go against what they at first appear to want to do, and then they start to resist and you have to use other forces to see what they are really feeling. One is dealing with something that is chronically volatile, like lava, except that there is the age old issue of illusion of space, weight, form and the physical reality of paint applied to a surface. The resultant paintings are comprised of increasing complex interconnected shapes, precariously balancing or pressing down upon other forms.

Landscape and in particular the geology) of the South West Coast of England (and light of Cornwall in particular) is an inspiration and forms the stimulus for initial sketches and recordings, but the work is not about landscape in the traditional sense. Instead, they are more like landscapes of the psyche – intuitive constructs that focus on creating irregular rhythms that enable the viewer’s eye to navigate around the surface plain of a square or rectangle. Other sources of inspiration come from contemporary classical music, aspects of chaos theory and the patterns and hidden rhythms of our lives; lives that are interconnected through road systems, flight patterns and electrical circuits.

www.andrewrollo.co.uk

Krystyna Lowicz

Krystyna Lowicz

1 Tower View

The Only Child

Menacing yet playful, strange yet familiar, the animal figures form a narrative that is enigmatic, and asks their audience to create an interpretation of their own.

Questionable poses with unusual props ask many questions.

Stillness

A dusty tableau open to conjecture perhaps hints at the air of a disbanded carnival. These lost members of a troupe seem anxious and frozen in time; perhaps turned to stone by the pathos of an earlier pomp and flamboyance.

Their aura evokes nebulous memories of the darker side of human experience, and harks back to characters of imaginary animal companions of childhood whose role was to sweep you away into a lovelier, imaginary place.

Perhaps animal expression appears dignified because of its innate lack of self awareness. Could this make us feel uncomfortable by offering a window into our own human self consciousness?

Metal, paper and plaster, provide a rawness and simplicity that allows for an unfinished quality. Drawing attention to the materiality helps the artist to focus on the emotional element of the work by allowing the figures to grow rapidly, with a serendipitous quality that feels like a magical power.

www.k-lowicz.co.uk

Paula MacArthur

Paula MacArthur

1 Tower View

Paula MacArthur is a painter. Her work has become increasingly painterly, with bold use of colour and experimentation with scale and gesture. Working quickly and instinctively she places colour onto the canvas working with wet on wet glazes, merging oily translucent layers with the brush and dropping colour, allowing it to bleed and grow into the surface.

MacArthur is currently working on a series of large scale canvases based on gemstones photographed in the Natural History Museum. Enlarged a thousand times these jewels transform into cosmic bodies; we can get lost in this other-worldly space ļ¬nding imagined pareidolia. Interest in this subject was born from entirely sentimental feelings, but these ideas quickly grew and jewels came to represent the excesses and obsessions which we all encounter, day to day, both personally and politically. The subject became a vehicle for extending her painting process and she experiments, pushing the medium towards the extremes of it’s capabilities. Working with thick impasto beside pools of barely tinted oil and turps and using exaggerated intense colour has in turn led to explorations towards abstraction. From a distance brushmarks and the trails of running paint are invisible, the paintings appear cohesive and photographic. However the images deteriorate as the viewer approaches to analyse them; the focus moves from the subject to the physicality of the process of making and echoes the elusive ideals these minute treasures symbolise.

www.paula-macarthur.com