Previous Exhibitions

Previous Exhibitions

Nicholette Goff

Nicholette Goff

Nicolette lives in Sandgate, Kent and has a studio in Folkestone's Creative Quarter. She has a long track record of exhibiting and participating in residencies in the UK and abroad. She initially trained as a sculptor but her work in the last ten years has been far more diverse and has included drawing, sculpture, printmaking and video. Her materials have been as traditional as paint and as unconventional as Mars Bars, toys and mud. For the past six years Goff's work has been based in the natural environment, with a predominant occupation of printmaking in the landscape. She works directly on the ground using her car as a printing press, driving over papers that have been soaked in ponds and streams. The prints, which are several meters across, show the gashes where root material has torn through and, in contrast, the delicate staining of flowers and berries. The paper is impregnated with the essence of the plant the traces of colour, structure and form that are compressed and embossed into the paper.

http://www.whiteshed.co.uk/

Joanna Jones

Joanna Jones

Joanna lives and works in Dover, Kent. After studying at Northwich and Byam Shaw Schools, Jones received her NDD in painting from Goldsmith's College before going on to the Royal Academy Schools. She spent over 20 years in mainland Europe developing her practice, exhibiting internationally and lecturing extensively on her work, before returning to the UK in 1997. Jones' work encompasses performance, photography, film and painting. She is a recipient of several professional awards including a scholarship from Kunstlerhaus Balmoral in 2000 and an Arts Council Year of the Artist Award for a work at Samphire Hoe, Kent in 2001. In 2006 the Pharos Trust brought out a major publication on her practice 'Joanna Jones' now available from www.cornerhouse.org/books

"My paintings are performed: a sensual act of painting and direct expression of being. In my work I am interested in both capture and transience, stillness and movement, dark and light".

http://www.joannajones.co.uk/

Nigel Green

Nigel Green

Nigel lives and works in Pett Level, East Sussex. In 2008 he completed a PhD in Arts and Communication at the University for the Creative Arts Maidstone, this followed an MA in Fine Art at the University of Brighton. Green exhibits widely in the UK and mainland Europe; current research focuses on reconstruction architecture in Picardy. Green's work has been published by Photoworks in 'Dungeness' (2004), with essays by David Chandler and Jonathan Glancey and 'Calais Vu Par' (2001), published by the Museum of Fine Art, Calais. In 2008 a selection of Green's Dungeness photographs were shown in 'The Nuclear Dilemma' at the International Red Cross Museum in Geneva. The work Green is showing for Kings Hill Art was made during two exchange projects in Northern France. The first centres on the urban landscape of Saint-Omer in Nord-Pas de Calais and the second is from an on-going project documenting the post-war reconstruction and space of Picardy. Both projects reflect Green's long term interest in post war architecture and its relationship to the legacy of modernism. Revealing both the remnants of utopian aspiration and the melancholy weight of historic actuality such sites reflect the complex forces of 20th century modernity.

Guy Archard

Guy Archard

Guy graduated from a BA in Photography at London College of Communication in 2007, and has gone on to exhibit his photography internationally. He lives and works in London, and is regularly involved in joint projects and commissions both here and abroad. The work on display here is from the series Ethereal Land, a project that explores the everyday banality of places and objects. The photographs appear as uncanny resemblances of the real world, each with its own ethereal, almost celestial, atmosphere. Through this process he strives to question one's assumptions of the apparently banal by showing the ordinary as both beautiful and mysterious. All of the images are based upon reality, employing no digital manipulation, yet they appear to sit somewhere in between the real and the fantastical. There is often an assumption of validity when considering the photographic image, and this is the core debate Guy's work engages with.

http://www.guyarchard.com/

Irene Marot

Irene Marot

Irene is a professional actress and completed her MA in fine Art Painting at the University of Brighton in 2007. Her work focuses on how the extraordinary is held in the ordinary; attempting to transform the apparent mundane. The 'Becketesque' landscapes are not obviously identifiable, as they are more of an 'innerscape' and the forms moving through the space are metaphors for the human condition.

Alan Rankle

Alan Rankle

Alan Rankle was born in Oldham in 1952. His recent series of paintings "Formal Concerns", take as their subject the development of landscape art related to changes in attitudes to the environment. In some works he seems to treat the entire history of landscape painting almost as a found object; manipulating and cross-referencing styles from diverse periods and cultures, within a fusion of abstract, trompel'oeil and figurative imagery. As well as working in video, photography, and installation projects, he remains at the forefront of artists expanding the vocabulary of contemporary painting, and contributing to the enduring relevance of Landscape Art in the light of environmental issues of the day. Through an ongoing series of International exhibitions his work has elicited much public interest and critical response.

"Rankle's depiction of Nature as luminous, tortured, polluted or damaged, conveyed in violent surges of paint, bold blocks of colour and diffused light make him a distinctive contemporary landscapist. "Jackie Wullschlager, Financial Times.

http://www.alanrankle.com/

Christian Funnell

Christian Funnell

Christian tries to invest foliage with human emotion - "I strive to not rest on my Laurels, but animate forms using repeated gesture or shape. I am interested by the apparently universal appeal of the eternal and how religious expression is found in a secular society. Most of my work is situated out side where I hope the element of surprise will provoke an open minded response in the viewer."

His time is divided between making sculptures and public and private commissions, that can be gates, railings, interactive water sculptures, seating or shelters. "It feels a controversial act to place an individually designed hand-crafted object into mass produced street furniture, chains and franchises. I think it can have the effect of adding confidence to the population, and a sense of belonging."

http://www.christianfunnell.com/