Previous Exhibitions

Previous Exhibitions

Katie Sollohub

Katie Sollohub

11 Tower View

Katie Sollohub is a Sussex based artist who is interested in documenting and recording the places she lives and works in through drawings, paintings, performance, photography and poetry.
Her work explores the narrative components surrounding objects, memories, interior and exterior spaces, brought to life with her spectacular use of colour and detail.
Katie is also an inspirational teacher, using her own experiences and processes to help motivate others. She aims to live life as a Creative Journey, and generously takes others along for the ride.

www.katiesollohub.co.uk

Becky Rose

Becky Rose

 4 Abbey Wood Rd

The medium that I use is primarily oil paint, however along the creative process I use a variety of tools and materials. When gathering imagery to work from I like to use my own photography when able, but I delve into all forms of the media, confronting and analyzing it through drawing techniques that are more graphic and unlike the final painting. The drawings enable me to grasp the composition, texture and forms that ultimately allow me to paint from an emotional response, leaving myself room to explore the colour and paint application freely.

This current body of work is based on my attachments and experiences of many walking trips to North Wales since I was a child. It is an area that was introduced to me by my father, and having recently lost him in 2012 I find myself being drawn to North Wales more than ever. The landscape of North Wales had a profound influence on my father, an influence that has been handed down to me. The mountainous landscape has an intensity of freedom and insignificance that enables you to make any negativity bearable, and this emotional attachment is the feeling I’m currently exploring within my paintings.

www.beckyrose.co.uk

Robert Bradford

Robert Bradford

 11 Tower View

My work for many years has consisted of a variety of experiments with utilitarian materials and found or used objects … usually in series’ and using intentionally basic low tech hands on construction methods.
My involvement is with ideas related to development /change transition and transformation… I worked as a psychotherapist with adults for several years in parallel with my art activities… some pieces deriving directly or indirectly from concepts inherent in this work…. particularly those regarding play as the fundamental root of creativity.
The six year long plastic toy series began in response to a moment in the studio spent staring into a box of outgrown and discarded toys that were there by chance. Initially I was caught by their random juxtapositions in the box, the intensity of their colours and the considerable variety of their forms . 
It occurred to me that no other found objects that I had come across before (or since) referenced so many aspects of human activity and existence…. and that probably no other objects had been loved so much by their owners. I also enjoyed the fact that each toy/mini sculpture had been carefully designed by artists that remained and remain unknown and un-credited.
I felt therefore that there was great potential for imbuing such objects with new life new content/contexts… and via these considerations and processes therefore… new meanings.
After several unsuccessful experiments with construction methods I found that screwing and gluing the toys into simple wooden frames provided the most flexibility and strength to the new forms regardless of their scale and often their content. 
I recognize that these works sometimes perch on the edge of being regarded as rubbish and/or kitsch and can potentially be seen as unserious or ‘not really art’ … none of such possible criticisms distress me ..
In some ways the pieces can be considered as historical ‘collections. …. that reflect and document the fads and fashions of their time.

www.robertbradford.co.uk

Angela Smith

Angela Smith

 6 Alexander Grove

The exposure and concealment of vulnerability is central to my practice. I am particularly interested in suppressed emotions and the anxiety and tension this evokes.
My paintings often contain figurative elements, but don't aim to illustrate reality. Instead they are a response to veiled, obscured and disguised feelings. As we grow we learn to mask disquiet and external signs of vulnerability and to promote a tougher less permeable exterior. A protective layer can develop into one of constraint, inhibiting true interaction and honesty. As a painter I want to look within myself and see if I can reach, expose and embrace this hidden place.
I paint primarily in enamel and gloss, often poured on to the canvas which is then tilted to create sinuous shapes. Forms emerge and are contrasted with bold solid areas of colour. Paint is layered to create a lustrous shine and intensity of colour. Surface is important varying from an impenetrable flat sheen to sags, wrinkles and furrows.
Strong bold colours and a high gloss finish are the antithesis of the fragile vulnerability which is central to the paintings. However, they reflect the confident veneer in which we cloak our innermost feelings. Containing, but allowing glimpses to the unsaid, the hidden and the awkward.

www.angelasmithart.com

Kirsty Kennedy

Kirsty Kennedy

34 Tower View

Kirsty Kennedy works as a full time practicing artist over the mediums of children’s books, film and painting and is based at Wimbledon Art Studios.

“Her painting technique is self-taught and possibly quite unique: each layer is built up with dabs of colour until the overall impression is created. Although her work carries the hallmarks of an impressionist, she combines an interest in naive art and works predominately from her imagination in order to enhance the overall effect.”

www.kkennedy.co.uk

Geoff Hands

Geoff Hands

  39 Kings Hill Ave

This selection of recent paintings ostensibly suggests abstract images. But they are made in response to recalling walks along coastlines, sometimes in Sussex but most often in Cornwall. On these walks it is essential to draw spontaneously in a sketchbook to make images to refer to later, in the studio.

However, in making these paintings, I am also relating decisions to memories, both visual and in feeling. Intuitive decisions and chance play their part too. The image will develop its own persona and, on a good day, memories of the sea and skies, the time of day, weather conditions, sounds and atmospheres will contribute to the making of the paintings.

So, paintings that one might label as ‘abstract’, and suggest a disconnection from the ‘real’, are rooted in lived experience. Of course, paintings in any visual language should be made to be experienced meaningfully by an audience and I trust that some connection with the work will be made and will resonate with the viewer.

www. geoffhands.co.uk

Stephanie Wilkinson

Stephanie Wilkinson

 35 Kings Hill Ave

Stephanie creates lively and colourful depictions of interiors, sometimes painted from observation and other times totally fictional, defined by colour, line or pattern.  Her various influences have been artists such as Matisse, Japanese woodblock prints and both traditional and contemporary textiles.
Born in Brazil, where both nature and urban landscapes contain colour in abundance, Stephanie uses colour confidently in her paintings and other designs, which include jewellery, cards and ceramics.  She began her Fine Art training while living overseas again in Jakarta, then continued at Richmond Adult College and Wimbledon School of Art.  She currently works in a studio in Teddington, SW London and exhibits and leads workshops regularly.  She is also a current member of the Lloyds Art Group at Lloyds of London.

www.stephaniewilkinson.co.uk

Ian Campbell-Briggs

Ian Campbell-Briggs

 30 Tower View

Born in 1964, he graduated from West Surrey College of Art and Design, taught by Bob Russell one of Henry Moore’s technicians. After graduating he taught for 17 years in Further and Higher Education, retiring in 2009 to concentrate more on his own work.
He is an Associate Member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors. He has exhibited widely in London, across the UK and has had two exhibitions in Europe. He has been commissioned to produce three large public art sculptures. 
In his work he uses a number of materials, generally the starting point is clay, which is then cast into resin and occasionally bronze. The figure is often the inspiration, by way of analytical drawing in clay, which then inspires the formalised components. His use of welded steel is becoming more prevalent, both with other materials and in its own right.
The purely abstract work although dispensing with the figure is formally linked to the figurative sculptures. They explore enclosing space through planar construction or taking a line for a walk through space.
All the sculptures are thematic, investigating topics such as Greco-Roman mythology, the mandorla, the passage through liminal spaces, labyrinths and the systematisation of knowledge.
The incremental approach and production of closely related works means that innovations appear gradual. Therefore experimental innovations are generally the product of extended research.
The etchings reflect his interest in architecture and are grounded in the tradition of observational drawing. The process of drypoint etching, working directly into the plate with no margin for error, fascinates him. They often show historic buildings, sometimes with figures but always drawn with strong chiaroscuro. The effects of strong light are important to him as it makes form and texture more evident. The etchings are printed in small editions of no more than six.

www.iancb.com

Roger Fleming-Gale

Roger Fleming-Gale

 

 30 Tower View

Born in London 1946. Spent majority of working life in the design industry - on retail based projects. Now have more time to get back to oils on canvas. Inspiration comes from many sources but primarily people and places. Its the special quality of light for landscapes and ephemeral moods of people, that become the desire to capture.

www.saatchionline.com/Fleming-Gale

Tess Williams

Tess Williams

1 Tower View

Tess is an abstract painter who lives and works in London. She is currently completing a Masters Degree in Fine Art at Central Saint Martins.

For Tess abstract painting is a liberation from the mundane images of everyday life. An escape from the screen based imagery that we are consumed by in the modern world. It’s an invitation to a different language that frees the mind from the busyness of specific associations of images and words. It is possible to slow the mind down and offer an opportunity to take another direction.
 

As in life, in her painting practice she is constantly building on previous decisions and movements. This pathway of actions and choices simulate our lives in many ways, further adding to the notion that a painting is a journey, evident to both the artist and the viewer. This is precisely why it is important for Tess to create gestural paintings, to show the process, including the imperfections and errors. In life there is order and chaos, synonymous with her painting.
 
Tess chooses to make large paintings, mainly on canvases that are bigger than herself so that she feels encompassed. The size affects the sense of her own body whilst she paints. The scale and size of the work impacts her response to the canvas, giving a sense of freedom in her mark making, allowing her whole body to move as she works.

 

http://www.tessrachelwilliams.com/

Alan Williams

Alan Williams

34 Tower View

Alan Williams is a metal artist and sculptor creating work from mostly found and reclaimed metal. Saw blades, cutlery, Bicycle and motorbike parts, skips, and all manner of unlikely items are used in his works of art and transformed into wild and mythical beasts, each one with it’s own personality and character.
Alan lives in Sussex and makes his work in an old dairy farm on the South Downs. Since graduating from Brighton University in 2001 he has exhibited work in the UK and overseas, created several public and community projects, auctioned pieces in association with Sotheby’s as well as for charities, and has recently created several public artworks and architectural installations in the South East.

http://www.alanwilliamsmetalartist.com/

Jonathan Luke

Jonathan Luke

1 Tower View

The three works being shown have just returned from Moscow where they were exhibited at the Russian Academy of Arts (in conjunction with the Moscow Museum of Modern Art) as part of a very successful solo exhibition of Jonathan’s work which was entitled Blue Silence, which ran between 12th September and 14th October 2013. The exhibition comprised 54 pieces which included 31 paintings and 23 limited edition multimedia works, images of which can be viewed on the artist’s website. 
The title Blue Silence was selected from a definition by Professor Colum Kenny who described it as “the silence that is found out of doors, sometimes during simple services on shipboard, faraway at sea… For this deep blue is the creative silence in the world of thought”.
Jonathan’s work is though in some respects also a study of colour, texture and shape. The colour may be loosely drawn from landscapes, from townscapes, but in reality is the result of carefully mixing colours out of tubes of paint and utilising their different qualities. Fundamental to this process is laying colours adjacent to each other to create harmonic and balanced forms, out of something which initially may seem random. The texture comes from the canvas, paint and layering. The layers are usually made up of paint, which are both added and then partially removed (sometimes as crudely as using an electric sander), but also digital images for the multimedia work. As observed by Sasha Burkhanova who curated the exhibition in Moscow “somewhere amid the layers of paint, between the surfaces of photo and glass, Jonathan Luke leaves the space for his viewer to enter the artwork. Not to observe it, but to enter, to participate.”

http://www.jluke.co.uk/