Previous Exhibitions

Previous Exhibitions

Christine Fedyk

Christine Fedyk

Exhibited in 11 Tower View

I graduated from Leicester De Montfort University in 1984 with a BA (Hons) Degree in Fine Art Painting and went on to work as a mural artist, illustrator and screen printer.

I continue to pursue creative ideas experimenting with various materials through print making and sculpture, though painting is the most constant.  I like to translate ideas from my sketch books and then work fairly intuitively with this information.

I mark in, block out, repeat and repair and absorb myself in this process allowing a kind of flow or rhythm to develop until I feel the overall canvas takes on a sense of its own.

http://www.christinafedyk.co.uk/

Sophie Dixon

Sophie Dixon

Exhibited 11 Tower View

As an attempt to undermine the viewer’s reliance upon convention and meaning, I produce work that isn’t an exact representation of the initial object, this often results in the object not being legible to the viewer at all. My aim is for people to be absorbed in what the finished image might be but it is important for my work to have an opening outcome, something for the viewer to decide.

Recently I began experimenting with new materials that have now been incorporated into my practice. As well as using what can be found in an art shop, I use materials such as boot polish, metal paint and crushed brick. The qualities of marks they make are brutal yet quite delicate. The practice of ‘playing’ contributes greatly to my work, both in the materials I use and how I add them to the painting.

When I draw, I look at the object, not the paper, which aids the initial abstraction of the image. I work quickly, creating a sense of the unknown, of what the final image might contain. This also applies to my process of painting; there is a shopping list quality to my work. I am rapidly attempting to communicate an abstracted structure, which contains balance and weight, mediated between expediency and substantially.

The image I draw can be varied, some are shapes taken and developed from photography, first hand observations or drawing from artists’ books. I draw forms that embrace a new identity from its original object. I consider myself to be developing a body of work that is at once gestural and abstract whilst paying attention to the demands of a playful art practice.

http://www.sophiedickson.co.uk/

Clive Soord

Clive Soord

Exhibited 11 Tower View

Clive Soord lives in Canterbury, Kent, in the south of England. When he’s not creating stuff from metal or clay in his workshops at home, he's probably passing on his extensive experience to others at Canterbury College.

Clive works extensively in clay and makes incredible ceramic jugs and urns, bowls, teapots, and mugs. But it’s his creation of an endless variety of richly detailed dragons, creatures and gargoyles, together with his lifelong interest in fantasy, magic and mythology, which led one newspaper reviewer to lend him the title ‘Master of the Dragons’.

Lost wax casting is an ancient art form and one for which Clive has a deep passion. He casts in bronze, aluminium and glass, performing the entire process himself from start to finish, using a variety of traditional and modern tools and kilns. His finished pieces, which range from mythical and real beasts to a giant chess set and life portraits, are truly labours of love.

http://www.clivesoord.co.uk/

Jon Mills

Jon Mills

Exhibited 11 Tower View & 34 Tower View
 

Born in Birmingham in 1959, Mills studied 3-Dimensional Design BA (Hons) at Wolverhampton, where his father, grandfathers and various ancestors had all plied their trades in a broad range of metalworking disciplines. Factory premises and jewellers workshops were a common place to be as a child. He was the recipient of a Crafts Council setting up grant in 1982 and started producing speculative exhibition work for a variety of outlets.

After moving to Brighton in 1985, he formed links with London-based galleries, the most well known being Ron Arad's One-off. His affiliation with the Crafts Council continued and over the years his work has be featured in some of their major touring exhibitions, including The New Spirit in 1987 and An Industry of One in 2001. His work has been shown extensively in Great Britain as well as in the USA, Europe and Japan.  Jon Mills produces metalwork of all shapes and sizes, from hand-held objects to large civic statements; but whether it be a functional local authority commission (such as a bridge or a chandelier), a piece of sculpture or an automaton, his witty personable style is immediately apparent.

'Mills makes metal do surprising things by using traditional techniques in unorthodox ways. In spite of being forged and hammered, welded and riveted, his work has a surprising, spontaneous quality as if it had been blown together by a particularly strong gust of wind'.*– *quotation from the essay Jon Mills © Rosemary Hill for Hartlepool Museum.  Mills is very much a hands-on maker, preferring to produce one-off designs. Occasionally clients have ordered repeats on a similar theme, but Mills has tended to resist mass or batch production, opting instead for a more spontaneous approach – the evolving of ideas through the making process, be it cupboard or bridge. He has undertaken numerous residencies in schools, normally in conjunction with a specific commission, often incorporating elements of the childrens' work into the finished piece.

http://www.metaljon.com/

Janet Maxwell

Janet Maxwell

Exhibited 30 Tower View

My abstract works are executed in acrylic and a variety of media including oil, collage, pastel and pencil.
Many of the canvases are completed by returning to the painting process, building the layers of colour and mark- making. The results are predominantly non-figurative abstractions of landscape, still life and three dimensional form.

A graduate of Camberwell School of Art and Goldsmiths University, I live on the north Kent coast.

I have also been an Art teacher for twenty years.

http://www.janetmaxwell.co.uk/

Carol Naylor

Carol Naylor

Exhibited 35 Kings Hill Ave

I trained at Goldsmiths School of Art, London and then went into teaching and lecturing. Since 1997 I have been free lance, working from my studio in Chichester, with the emphasis is on exhibiting and working to commission.

I stitch directly and intensely onto painter’s canvas using a wide range of rayon, metallic, woollen and cotton threads. This causes natural undulations which I leave in as part of the creative process. Drawing freely with the sewing machine needle provides the marks a paintbrush or pencil would make, allowing my ideas to unfold as I work, and the richly coloured threads offer a wide and exciting palette.

My work is about the exploration of surface and mark making. Textures, colour and shadows with contrasting shafts of light are explored through these heavily stitched surfaces that undergo subtle changes depending on the onlooker’s point of view.

I look, I draw, I select and I translate.  Inspiration comes from two sources. Personal experiences and observations provide the source materials, whilst the works of specific artists such as Dufy or Klee have informed my use of colour and line. Other influences include the poetry of both Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, and in some works I have explored nature, land and light with their works in mind.  I have had several solo shows as well as contributing to many other exhibitions across the UK and abroad. Recent exhibitions include the prestigious show SOFA in Santa Fe and Chicago USA. . My work is widely represented in corporate, public and private Collections.

http://www.carolnaylor.co.uk/

Sam Topping

Sam Topping

Exhibited 39 Kings Hill Ave

The work has been produced in a variety of media, from screen printing and woodblock prints to combining print with painting. The current collection of work has been inspired by the temporary qualities of natural forms and our desire to document and to preserve. Organic matter has been scattered or arranged and used as a direct stencil for the prints, retaining a sense of the actual objects. The original material in many cases has disintegrated leaving only the print, a way of capturing an imprint of a moment in time.

I was born in Belfast in the 70's. I completed Foundation studies in Art and Design at the University of Ulster, a degree in Fine Art Printmaking at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee and a Post Graduate Diploma in Advanced Printmaking at Central St Martins. I live and work in London.

http://www.samtoppingart.bksites.net/

Sue Davis

Exhibited 39 Kings Hill Ave

I always loved to draw and to make things as child. However, following an art school training, I went on to a career in commercial interior design which rather lead me away from any kind of ‘hands-on’ crafted type of art practice. When I gave up my career to have a family I found I had both the time and inclination to begin again to draw, paint and to experiment with other crafts such as jewellery making and printmaking. I found in printmaking a process that allowed me to experiment with colour in a loose and liberating way.

I find colour exhilarating and powerful: it has the ability to evoke strong feelings in the observer that are hard to capture in words. By using abstraction in my paintings and placing colour in the context of pattern and texture alone and isolating it from the forms that it usually adorns in the world of recognisable objects, I aim to explore this capacity that colour has to move us.

David Pratt

Exhibited 30 Tower View

My work sets out to develop personal mythologies through drawing, utilising repetition and variation. I explore themes combining experience with observation. I start with drawing as a means of establishing some fixed point around which the work can develop. My subject matter comes from assorted eras as the mood takes me. I strive for a ‘pancronicity’, troubled not so much with the now, as with all time.

I seek the universal in the particular, rather than the general. This displays itself in my use of the human figure which often takes the form of semi-portraiture, as opposed to unfocused crowd. Around this person-centred tableau, I introduce the familiar in unexpected combination as a means to hint at narratives and symbols. My method is to behave as if I am writing a familiar language with established rules, playing this off against our era’s uncertain eclecticism. Paradoxically my work is very eclectic in its use of objects and material, frequently taking the form of whimsical contraption.

http://www.davidpratt.co.uk/

Iyasha Salih

Iyasha Salih

Exhibited 34 Tower View

'In my art I love invoking a strong desire that talks to you and gets you to change, feel passionate and inspired in your own life. My art is nourishment for your Soul.'

The diversity of sources from which Iaysha takes inspiration is reflected in the spectrum of her subject matter; which extends from pure abstraction through to landscape and figurative work. The impulse to put brush to canvas can be triggered by a song or poem, by the sky, or by the colour of a stranger’s dress as they stroll by. The sights, smells, colours and culture of places that Iaysha has visited on her extensive travels have proven to be a constant source of artistic stimulation. Iaysha has lived in Australia and Thailand and has also travelled to Peru and Arizona. Her works are not a topographical study of the locations she has visited; instead they capture the essence of the place. She seeks to convey more to the viewer than simply what is present; to give an internal and spiritual insight into the magic of nature, creating an intensified vision rather than a naturalistic description. The works are not painted en plein air, but considered over time and painted in the studio; guaranteeing that the landscape produced is inspired by the spirit of the place rather than its geographic details. In the words of Chekhov, ‘the subject must pass through the sieve of my memory so that alone which is important remains’.

In Iaysha’s gift as a colourist we can see the influence of several artists whom she admires. Her abstract and landscape work is certainly reminiscent of the late great Donald Hamilton Fraser RA, and her layering and washes of colour surely owes a debt to another Scottish artist, Barbara Rae RA. When questioned to name the artist who has had the greatest impact on her work Iaysha does not hesitate, ‘Turner’ is the immediate reply. ‘His impressionistic studies of the sky fascinate me, his use of light to create an almost mystical atmosphere is beautiful to behold. Sometimes I think I could just stare at the sky all day! I also love Peter Lanyon’s early work, they convey such emotional intensity'. Perhaps the conveyance of emotion is what draws Iaysha to pure abstraction; her work is about atmosphere, imagination and feeling: universal themes that defy the boundaries of figurative subject matter. ‘I love to create landscapes and figurative work too- I feel no restrictions as an artist. But my abstract work definitely comes from a deeper place.'

http://www.bluemoongallery.co.uk/

Clare Winchester

Exhibited 6 Alexander Grove

Born in rural Sussex in 1960 Clare grew up in the deep countryside, and the wild beauty of nature has been her inspiration ever since.

Her work leans towards the abstract. The work is contemporary, atmospheric and evocative. It immediately draws the viewer in with its emotional appeal and movement that invites exploration. With the wide use of a variety of techniques, drawn from long experience as a printmaker and painter, Clare builds up layers of colour and texture by using oils on a waxed board.

The work evolves from memories of walks and places experienced. Typically she uses mixed media and a rich, yet subtle, palette of colours to create pieces which vividly convey a sense of place.

http://www.clarewinchester.co.uk/