Previous Exhibitions

Previous Exhibitions

David Armitage

David Armitage

Exhibiting in 30 Tower View

David Armitage is a successful abstract artist of great originality. He is a Tasmanian who trained in Melbourne and spent much of his life in New Zealand. He painted and ran the City Art Gallery programme in Auckland before coming to East Sussex to live in 1973. He has, above all, a splendid sense of colour and form and his work clearly shows a nostalgia for the strong light and surroundings of his early life near the southern Pacific Ocean. One senses he is a beachcomber who loves wandering along the edge of the sea picking up dried pieces of wood or examining sea life in the sand pools or underwater. These are his main imagery sources which he manipulates into magical but strange shapes on both his large and quite small canvases.

http://www.davidarmitage.com/

Fiona Robinson

Fiona Robinson

Exhibiting in 11 Tower View

“I am interested in expressing the emotions that I experience in landscape. What I record in drawing is not what I know to be there intellectually or exactly what I see with my eyes. What I record is what my senses were engaging with physically and my imagination was caught by. I can retrace the same path repeatedly and each drawing would be different. My experience of landscape is about the sensation of movement.”

Fiona’s etchings and monoprints are based on drawings made directly in the landscape while walking. Her new works include a series of panoramic or bird’s eye views of the railway lands in Lewes made on Japanese Gampi tissue.

http://www.fionarobinson.co.uk/

Fiona Stanbury

Fiona Stanbury

Exhibiting in 39 Kings Hill Avenue

I am interested in creating space and movement through the use of colour and shapes. Sometimes I start purely from marks and washes of colour as I search for a paintscape that allows colour to find an identity and structure. Often the space becomes ambiguous as I challenge my ideas of paint-created space. Composition is another focus; how to create a composition that holds the meanings of the colours, and at the same time is the colour.

In the search for the 'right' composition, I use colour as marks, colour as lines, I draw with colour, and use colour as forms. It is important that the paintings become a self-contained world, and need no reference to the external world, though some paintings (particularly the watercolours made in situ) have more landscape references than others.

I tend to work in series and my starting points are often landscapes, cityscapes, and the female form. But just as often I will start from a word, phrase, or sequence of colours.

http://www.fionastanbury.com/

Peter Gates

Peter Gates

Exhibiting in 34 Tower View

My photographic practice is concerned with the poetry of the everyday. I am interested in the landscape in which the epic of domestic drama unfolds and the detail around which this endless cycle is played out.

I am in pursuit of an unresolved narrative told through the crystallization of time, meditative glances at the spaces in between and that which takes place at the intersection of concrete reality and
subjective perception.

http://www.petergates.com/

Gosia Kryk

Gosia Kryk

34 Tower View

Gosia graduated from State Art Secondary School in Naleczow and Gdansk Academy of Fine Arts.
During her studies the artist chose oil painting as a way to express herself. Years of designer’s work however have influenced strongly her idea of creation. Her oil painting process aims towards a two-dimensional piece of applied art. The artist’s works are neither telling stories nor manifesting any social or political point of view. Despite her openness when painting she remains silent in a particular way.

A dialog between the viewer and the work takes place at the level of emotions induced by associations.
She concentrates on technical issues, colour composition and aesthetics of the picture.

http://www.gosiakryk.co.uk/

Giuseppe D'Innella

Giuseppe D'Innella

Exhibiting in 11 Tower View

Giuseppe D'Innella is an Italian artist who lived around the world before settling in Wimbledon. He started mainly as a landscape painter, using acrylics on canvas, and working rapidly in the open air for many years in Australia, South America and Italy. From 2007 he joined Wimbledon Art Studios and has developed many abstract themes and techniques, based on his own landscapes, most of them sketched in Southern Italy in summer.

His colours are luminous and warm, reflecting his Italian roots and Australian experience.  Lately he has discovered screenprinting, which has become his passion and full-time activity.

http://www.dinnella.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/

William Hudson

William Hudson

Exhibiting in 30 Tower View

W.M.Hudson (Bill) attended KIAD at Canterbury. Specialised in sculpture, undertaking a residency at Canterbury Cathedral’s stone restoration department, on graduation in 1995 he undertook residencies in The Young European Sculpture Park, Czech Republic and was selected for Stour Valley Arts, exchange in the town of Arque, France.

He specializes in wood carving, construction and casting in bronze and iron and a crucial part of his practices is drawing. Recurring themes in his work are found in the city/ human-made and found objects, urban and rural landscapes. As he explore shape and form, sometimes making an uneasy alliances or tension between material. His gallery based work compliments his public works and allows him to extend the themes in his work.

He has undertaken private/public sculpture commissions throughout the UK and Europe, worked on education projects for schools, and museums, including the Geffrye Museum, V&A, Tower of London, National Trust, and London Transport Museum.

http://www.wmhudson.com/

Paz Perlman

Paz Perlman

Exhibiting in 34 Tower View & 11 Tower View

My art reflects the universal desire to make sense of the world around us and our place within it. I feel compelled to grapple with the unconscious forces within and to manifest them in abstract forms. In that manner, I see art as a mirror reflecting from the inside out.  Having originally trained and worked internationally as an instructor in dance, tai chi and yoga, I draw upon my understanding of movement to inform my practice and am fascinated by the challenge to bring matter to life.

I am attracted to architectural structures of modern life as much as being inspired by the power and flow of organic forms in nature.

This dynamic combination of precision and fluidity expresses itself in my most recent sculptures.
Earlier works sit between primitive symbolism and the experimental element found in minimalism.
My hope is to offer viewers the opportunity to recognise and connect to a deeper aspect of themselves.
I have a studio in Brighton and use a variety of materials such as stone, wood, metal, and clay.
I am a member of Surrey Sculpture Society and exhibits and takes private commissions. Recent exhibitions include RHS Wisley, Sunbury Walled Garden, and Brighton Open Houses.  My works are in private collections in various countries including Holland, Switzerland, UK and Israel.

http://www.pazperlman.co.uk/

Paul Cox

Paul Cox

Exhibiting in 11 Tower View

‘Serious sculpture with a smile’

I am fascinated by drawing and the ability to create an image from lines and marks on paper. I like to experiment with paper and cardboard exploring scale and form, which are translated into more permanent media like ceramic, bronze, steel and wood – enjoying the variety of materials employed in my sculpture like hard metal and soft clay I can realise the sometimes surreal world from within. For me being an artist is a form of constant play and enquiry in many forms on many levels……my work is born from the bonding of internal and external experiences and the conclusion of a piece is the point at which it exists by its self with the artist the link in a process of creation.

Paul has developed some unique ‘rapid prototyping’ techniques which enables him to explore full scale ideas quickly. His inventive use of material is born out of his strong desire to create objects that have a physical relationship with the world around them. His selection of materials is made by the decision that they must be freely available. One of his favourite materials to use is disused packaging, cardboard and bubble rap. This unassuming mundane material is so abundant in todays society, it has given him the freedom to play and explore. By cutting forming and manipulating it with his hands glueing and sticking it he can create very complex shapes allowing him to create any form he wishes. The forms can be polychromed with resin worked with clay or cast into bronze to create permanent works that can be placed outside. This process can also be applied to metal fabrication.

http://www.paul-cox.co.uk/

Maria Albiez

Maria Albiez

Exhibiting in 30 Tower View

For me, the creative process is about developing a conversation with nature and her forces, and starting to listen to her with my heart. Although my sculpture is non-representational it is strongly related to human questions of encounter, relationship, the space in between, the centre and the inner life.
I am inspired by stone, especially the slate of North Wales with its dark, deep purple/black tones and soft forms. I also enjoy using found materials, often wood, which has already been worked by nature to which I add further transformation (sometimes a lot, sometime a little) to enhance its beauty and give it meaning. Often I use mixed materials to create a dialogue between the various components of the form and so add a higher level of complexity to the work.

Since 2000 I have been a member of Surrey Sculpture Society and exhibited with them at many prestigious venues. I also exhibit regularly with the South East Open Studios programme and at other venues in SE England.

My work can be found in many private and company collections. I am a co-director and tutor at the Hoathly Hill Sculpture Studios, West Sussex. I am also a state registered Art Therapist (STRATh) with a private practice and using the healing properties of sculpture and painting.

http://www.surreysculpture.org.uk/artists/maria-albiez

Lyndsey Searle

Lyndsey Searle

Exhibiting in 11 Tower View

Physicality is ever present within my objects. I am interested in the nature of receptiveness and physical connection through representational, almost symbolic, and intuitive approaches. In relation to this my practice more specifically investigates the possibility of a portable objects ability to respond, interact or connect to its space/environment. Despite their scale all works are determinedly portable objects - they represent themselves as being in-flux with regard to place (often with wheels, G-clamps or handles) occasionally through a questioning of the plinth due to it‘s intermediate place between work and space. I believe to get to the very root of sense, physical experience and interaction the work has to refuse to relate to a specific place and in it’s own self-contained way indicate itself as being pliable, penetrable, absorbing, exploring or similar.

The works I make vary from simply responding to universal forces such as gravity to liberally investigating the use of funnels, which have an innate ‘receiving’ attribute, orifices and vents (or even the holes in knits determine a work as being penetrable and so capable of interaction). The investigation is continued with the use of viscous syrup occassionally smeared over the forms, with this I am attempting to evaluate the role that viscous liquids may have - I suspect viscous liquids can have a ‘conduit’ function in that they form a more physical connection acting as a fluid extension of the form serving as mediator. I pursue greater understanding and to make increasingly inventive representations in relation to these issues.

More recently I have been concerned with utilizing a slightly different language and fixing hazard beacon lights to my sculptures. This has been done as an exploration and extension of a sculptures ability to announce its own presence, I have tried to extend this natural aspect of sculpture with the use of the beacons so that the work more actively communicates with its surroundings, a beacon also in marking the sculptures space shares some merit with plinths and so there have become a number of related concerns which have founded an interest in the flashing lights and which I propose to further pursue in future work.

http://www.lyndseysearle.com/