Previous Exhibitions

Previous Exhibitions

Lyndsey Searle

Lyndsey Searle

Exhibiting in 11 Tower View

Physicality is ever present within my objects. I am interested in the nature of receptiveness and physical connection through representational, almost symbolic, and intuitive approaches. In relation to this my practice more specifically investigates the possibility of a portable objects ability to respond, interact or connect to its space/environment. Despite their scale all works are determinedly portable objects - they represent themselves as being in-flux with regard to place (often with wheels, G-clamps or handles) occasionally through a questioning of the plinth due to it‘s intermediate place between work and space. I believe to get to the very root of sense, physical experience and interaction the work has to refuse to relate to a specific place and in it’s own self-contained way indicate itself as being pliable, penetrable, absorbing, exploring or similar.

The works I make vary from simply responding to universal forces such as gravity to liberally investigating the use of funnels, which have an innate ‘receiving’ attribute, orifices and vents (or even the holes in knits determine a work as being penetrable and so capable of interaction). The investigation is continued with the use of viscous syrup occassionally smeared over the forms, with this I am attempting to evaluate the role that viscous liquids may have - I suspect viscous liquids can have a ‘conduit’ function in that they form a more physical connection acting as a fluid extension of the form serving as mediator. I pursue greater understanding and to make increasingly inventive representations in relation to these issues. More recently I have been concerned with utilizing a slightly different language and fixing hazard beacon lights to my sculptures.

This has been done as an exploration and extension of a sculptures ability to announce its own presence, I have tried to extend this natural aspect of sculpture with the use of the beacons so that the work more actively communicates with its surroundings, a beacon also in marking the sculptures space shares some merit with plinths and so there have become a number of related concerns which have founded an interest in the flashing lights and which I propose to further pursue in future work.

http://www.lyndseysearle.com/

Sophie Abbot

Sophie Abbot

Exhibiting in 11 Tower View

Exhibiting throughout the UK and selling to an International market, Sophie works from her studio in Brighton. Her prolific exploration of the British seaside, through the layering of vivid flourescent colours and energetic mark-making continues to be a vital source of inspiration. Sophies paintings are a response to a place in time and explore the dual aspect of the natural and the man made. Her colours, often to optical effect, focus on the interplay of space versus intense areas of solid forms, mark making and motifs. The abstract nature of Sophie’s paintings allow the viewer to escape within the image. She is fascinated by the landscape that surrounds her and strives to capture the essence of this in her playful and atmospheric paintings.

http://www.sophieabbott.net/

Robert Koenig

Robert Koenig

Exhbiting in 11 Tower View & 30 Tower View

Robert Koenig was born in Manchester in 1951. A contemporary of Anthony Gormley at the prestigious Slade School of Art in London, he has exhibited widely over the past 30 years both in the UK and internationally. He has worked on numerous public sculpture commissions around the UK. He is an Associate Member of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. His monumental woodcarving exhibition “Odyssey” has been touring continuously since 1997 visiting major venues in the Ukraine, Poland, Jersey and the UK.

"I am interested in the culture of wood. As a student I enjoyed looking at the large carved wood reclining figures of Henry Moore, the sculpture of Henri Gaudier Brzeska, Brancusi and Michelangelo and also the renaissance woodcarvers of Central Europe. They were all inspirational people but did not directly influence my work. I found my own way, decided what my personal concerns were and developed an inherited facility with working wood to make my statements. I have carved, assembled, constructed, painted and used tree trunks, planks and sawdust to tell my stories."

http://www.robertkoenig-sculptor.com/

Chloe Manasseh

Chloe Manasseh

My most recent paintings are drawn from media coverage of the flooding in Pakistan, using aerial photographs of the inundated areas and news images as references, exploring what images can become when viewed out of context. There is a contrast between the on-going devastation and the inherent visual charm of the drowned scenery. The original photos, when taken out of the context of ‘trauma’, become surreal and disarming; this gulf between event and object further widened by developing and transforming these images through the act of painting. It is this duality that informs my work.

By using imagery derived from trauma, I have had to address various issues and questions: one can ask what role does my art play, and what gives me the right to aestheticize the disaster? I am the furthest degree of separation from the event, and as a third party spectator what justifies me distorting the accuracy of an event to make it look less ‘tragic’?

My paintings focus on the sublime force and danger of nature, creating a contradiction between the allure of a drowning landscape, and the harsh reality of the trauma and desolation resulting from the natural disaster. My paintings however do not take on the responsibility of evoking people’s trauma, when it is not my place to do so, but rather put emphasis on the ambiguity of the subject and image when looked at out of its original context.

The size of my work, balanced with an unconventional play on scale through the use of abstract imagery, creates an incoherent reality with an alluring visual landscape. Indeed the work has a liquid sensibility, evocative of a drowning landscape and the ambiguity of the image.

http://www.chloemanasseh.com/

Lyndsey Searle

Lyndsey Searle

Exhbiting in 30 Tower View

Physicality is ever present within my objects. I am interested in the nature of receptiveness and physical connection through representational, almost symbolic, and intuitive approaches. In relation to this my practice more specifically investigates the possibility of a portable objects ability to respond, interact or connect to its space/environment. Despite their scale all works are determinedly portable objects - they represent themselves as being in-flux with regard to place (often with wheels, G-clamps or handles) occasionally through a questioning of the plinth due to it‘s intermediate place between work and space. I believe to get to the very root of sense, physical experience and interaction the work has to refuse to relate to a specific place and in it’s own self-contained way indicate itself as being pliable, penetrable, absorbing, exploring or similar.

The works I make vary from simply responding to universal forces such as gravity to liberally investigating the use of funnels, which have an innate ‘receiving’ attribute, orifices and vents (or even the holes in knits determine a work as being penetrable and so capable of interaction). The investigation is continued with the use of viscous syrup occassionally smeared over the forms, with this I am attempting to evaluate the role that viscous liquids may have - I suspect viscous liquids can have a ‘conduit’ function in that they form a more physical connection acting as a fluid extension of the form serving as mediator.

I pursue greater understanding and to make increasingly inventive representations in relation to these issues. More recently I have been concerned with utilizing a slightly different language and fixing hazard beacon lights to my sculptures. This has been done as an exploration and extension of a sculptures ability to announce its own presence, I have tried to extend this natural aspect of sculpture with the use of the beacons so that the work more actively communicates with its surroundings, a beacon also in marking the sculptures space shares some merit with plinths and so there have become a number of related concerns which have founded an interest in the flashing lights and which I propose to further pursue in future work.

http://www.lyndseysearle.com/

Lorraine Benton

Lorraine Benton

Exhibiting in 30 Tower View & 34 Tower View

As my practice has begun to develop, the form in which the subject matter is expressed has become increasingly abstract in nature and larger in scale. I am drawn to making abstract works, as I find the loose visual description allows more freedom for interpretation and a greater sense of a visual journey, slowing down the experience and allowing the viewer to explore and connect with the artwork on a deeper, more personal level.

The scale of an artwork plays a similarly important role, with regard to the way in which it communicates with its audience. As the dimensions of the form increase in size, particularly beyond human proportions, I feel that the work engages with its viewer in a more profound way.

http://www.lorraine.bentonweb.co.uk

Anna Davanzo

Anna Davanzo

Exhibiting in 6 Alexander Grove

I am a practising artist living and working in Hackney, London, I trained at Central St Martins School of Art and later graduated from the Royal Academy Schools. My experiences are gathered from living in Spain, France and Italy.

As an abstract painter, the concept behind my work portrays strong autobiographical elements that reflect and link directly to my emotional response to the landscape.

I do this by attempting to unravel the experiences of the moment from both external and internal points of view.

This creative process incorporates a superstructure and the accidental potential that is fired up within it. This combined with shifting picture plains as well as depiction of colour allows conscious and well as unconscious shapes and Forms to present themselves on the canvas.

Butterflies, a flock of migrating geese, the vastness and intensity of a Mountain range all add to the fragility and beauty of our changing landscapes,Juxtaposed with the forces of nature, it is this element of tension which is the starting point for the paintings.

http://www.annadavanzo.co.uk/

Felix Lowe

Felix Lowe

Exhibiting in 34 Tower View

Felix Lowe is a London-based writer, photographer, blogger and editor with interests ranging from professional cycling to the diamond industry. He has had work published in The Telegraph, The Times, The Guardian, The Observer, CNBC Business, CycleSport, Wild Junket and Palladium Magazine.

Felix has travelled to Siberia, South Africa and Botswana to visit the mines of De Beers and Alrosa, the world's leading diamond producers; he has interviewed Russian pop divas and music producers in Moscow, art smugglers in London and some of the world's most famous cyclists in Australia.

Cycling is a big passion for Felix, who writes a weekly blog for Yahoo!-Eurosport and for an Australian sports opinion website called The Roar. Felix also covers all the major professional races for Eurosport and has a monthly column with the new monthly UK publication, Cyclist. Last year, Felix co-edited and co-wrote a 180-page events guide to London. This year, Felix edited LondonTown.com's Olympics and Paralympics pages, and he is currently co-editing a full events guide for London in 2013.

These two photos are part of a collection taken in the remote Siberian town of Mirny in Yakutia, from where Alrosa operates a lot of its diamond mining operations. Felix was there in May 2008 as the first part of a series of diamond mining-related projects.

Felix has lived in Paris, Bordeaux, Sydney and London, and has photos from cities and places all over the world. Besides travel and cycling, general themes that interest and inspire him are abstract wall art, graffiti, landscapes, trees, reflections, the colour blue, cloud formations, safari, people, the nonsensical and the whimsical.

http://www.felixlowe.co.uk

Greg Levitt

Exhibiting in 4 Abbey Wood Road

When asked why he only ever makes just the one photograph of each subject the American photographer Thomas Joshua Cooper recently answered “Because there is too much stuff.” And indeed there is.

The world is full of too much stuff - be it too many cars, too many talent shows on tv, too many semi-automatic weapons in the suburbs of every town in America, and certainly too many digital photos clogging up computer hard-drives around the globe. Next time you’re tempted to press the shutter take a moment to ask yourself why you’re taking that particular photo at that particular time. If you can’t come up with an answer then don’t take the photo.

Photography is a tool that should be used to elicit discussion and intercourse, questioning the way we understand and experience the world around us, and how we relate to the marginal non-spaces that surround us - peripheral areas that all too often reflect our abuse of The Earth and destruction of its natural resources.  Recent MA Photography Graduate.

http://www.gregoryreubenlevitt.com/

Gill Copeland

Gill Copeland

Gill's professional career in photography has spanned over 25 years.

“I knew from the age of fourteen I wanted to be a photographer… growing up in Sheffield in the late 60's and 70's I knew it wouldn't be easy.”

Qualifying in 1984 with a HND in photography “I started my career as a travel photographer”, later setting up a commercial studio in London to specialise in portraiture.

“The skill to photographing people is to capture that moment when their true character emerges.”

During this time she won numerous national awards for her photographic work 12 years ago Gill moved to Sussex and into the field of fine art photography.

“I love working with light… its colours and intensities can shape an image into something quite unique.”

Jan Brine

Jan Brine

Exhibiting in 35 Kings Hill Ave

I studied painting at Bromley College of Art and the Royal Academy School.. I exhibited figurative paintings widely. However, a few years ago, I realised that I needed to change direction and move on to explore the possibilities of working in a totally abstract way.

This has been an exciting and demanding challenge, requiring an intuitive and spontaneous reaction to the development of the painting. There is no preconception of the finished image , and a painting usually evolves slowly over many sessions of reworking until it feel satisfactorily resolved, and will hopefully engage the viewer.

Sheila Marlborough

Sheila Marlborough

Exhibiting in 39 Kings Hill Ave

Sheila was born in Sussex and attended courses at Brighton Polytechnic and St Ives School of Painting from 1978 – 1985.

She had her work frequently shown with the Royal Institute of Watercolour Painters at the Mall Galleries in London and in 2002 won the Royal Watercolour Society Open Exhibition Award at the Bankside Gallery. During this time she taught art to adult students and exhibited her work throughout Sussex and in St Ives.

In 2005 she was elected President of the Sussex Watercolour Society, and from 2005 – 2011 was a member of Chalk Gallery, an artist-led co-operative gallery in Lewes.

Recently she has shown work in the Brighton Festival Open Houses and in 2010 and 2011 at the Brighton Art Fair in the Corn Exchange.

In March 2012, Sheila had a joint exhibition at the Hop Gallery, Lewes.

Three of her paintings have been selected for auction, at Toovey`s Contemporary Art Auction and will be on show at Horsham Museum in June/July 2012.

"In Cornwall I met several of the well known artists living and working there and I continue to return every year for further inspiration. This has really influenced the direction of my art from the figurative to a more abstract concept. Having painted in watercolour for many years, I then found that acrylics gave me more scope for experimenting with collage and mixed media. Strong composition and emotive colour interest me most, enabling me to create an individual and atmospheric interpretation of the landscape."

http://www.sheilamarlborough.co.uk/